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January 20, 2019

Swiss Company to Get CO2 Out of the Atmosphere and Into Sparkling Water

You may soon be able to drink sparkling water that contains carbon dioxide captured directly from the atmosphere.

Climeworks, a company that specializes in carbon-capture technology, will be applying their air filtration machines to suck up CO2 for use in the creation of sparkling water.

The company partnered with Swiss beverage brand Valser, which is owned by Coca-Cola HBC, and one of the beverage industry leaders in sustainability. The drinks made with the captured carbon will be on supermarket shelves in Europe within the next three months.

Climeworks machines use large air filters to collect carbon dioxide direct from the air in one step—and the startup already has 14 carbon-capture facilities installed atop power plants, waste incinerators, and other industrial buildings across Europe.

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The buildings supply excess heat and power to run the modular machines.

According to the company, “The majority of the energy required to run the direct air capture plant comes from low-grade/waste heat.”

The captured emissions are currently being used to boost greenhouse crop production, help create synthetic fertilizer, and renewable fuel.

They hope their machines will be able to capture at least 1% of the world’s CO2 emissions by 2025.

“Ultimately what we are trying to do is halt climate change, or even reverse climate change, so be able to scale up to the size that could really make an impact,” Climworks’ communications manager Louise Charles told Business Insider.

(WATCH a 2017 company video below, to see the machines at work…)

Clean Up Negativity By Sharing The Good News To Social MediaPhoto by Valser

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